More Than 75 Wedding Etiquette Tips (in 140 Characters or less)

Twitter-inspired, this blog is full of wedding etiquette tips and ideas for how to handle sticky situations — or even the most common situations. Shared below is a list of 75+ of our favorite tips in one kick-ass wedding etiquette blog post…all in 140 characters or less.

  1. Parents taking over wedding decisions? Say “Thanks to your advice, we made X a priority. But to include it, we cut back on Y.”
  2. Who should I tell first that I’m engaged? First, tell your children, then parents, family, friends…then social media.
  3. What not to wear as a wedding guest: any shade of white, tons of bling or sequins, sultry sexy outfits, and jeans
  4. Should I bring a gift to an engagement party? Generally, gifts aren’t expected, but a nice card or small gift is nice.
  5. Give guests 15+ days between the invitation’s arrival and the RSVP date. Make the RSVP date 30 days from your wedding date.
  6. If I know someone can’t be at my wedding, do I send an invitation anyway?Not unless it’s a close relative who wants a keepsake
  7. The cake cutting ceremony ( or serving of dessert) is typically the signal to guests that it is ok to leave without being rude
  8. If someone asks me to be in their wedding, do I have to ask them to be in mine? No, but you could give them another task!
  9. What is the correct way to address a check as a wedding gift? There is no rule to WHOM, but don’t make it out to both people
  10. Am I expected to invite all my coworkers? No, but try to pick a logical division (your team), so people don’t feel excluded.
  11. Should I tip my wedding vendors? Not if you have a contract with them. A small tip for musicians, etc. & do pay for meals for your vendors.
  12. Are you obligated to invite a guest’s date to your rehearsal dinner? It would be a nice courtesy, but no.
  13. All guests 18 and older should receive their own wedding invitation.
  14. Bringing a gift to the reception requires babysitting. Have it sent to their home pre-honeymoon (Midwest etiquette may differ)
  15. Only bring a +1 to a wedding if your invitation listed you “and a guest”.
  16. Involve your groom. The honeymoon, rehearsal dinner, and the DJ/band playlist are great ways for your guy have extra input.
  17. Having fun table names for a seating chart? Add small numbers too. Guests will appreciate the navigational map of your room!
  18. It’s okay to send a “B-list” of invitations, but do it discreetly and quickly. No one wants to find out they were on list B.
  19. Sending a wedding gift? The general rule is 30/60: You can send it starting 30 days before the big day or up to 60 days after.
  20. Anybody invited to the engagement party should be invited to the wedding as well.
  21. A wedding website is a far better option than creating a wedding “fan page” on Facebook for guests to see info for your wedding
  22. Want a unique favor? On the Arbor Day Foundation website, you can buy a tree to be planted in your honor in a national forest.
  23. On envelopes, a medical doctor should have “Doctor” in front of his/her name; a PhD should have “Dr.” in front of his/her name
  24. At midwest bridal showers, it’s common to pass opened gifts & cards. A personal note to the bride could be seen by all!
  25. Should you include a gift registry on your wedding invitation? Our answer may surprise you.
  26. People used to think it was rude for the bride’s mother to host the bridal shower. New rules say anyone can throw your shower!
  27. No longer is the bride’s family supposed to foot the bill for the entire wedding. Your in-laws-to-be may want to help as well!
  28. When facing the altar, the bride stands on the left, the groom on the right and seated guests should follow suit.
  29. For honorary bridesmaids, choose an older relative instead of a close friend who didn’t make the cut. Save hurt feelings.
  30. If you get an engagement e-card from a couple, you are not required to get them a gift. A solid congrats in enough.
  31. The best man gives the first toast, followed by the maid of honor, the parents (if they wish), then the couple.
  32. If you’re invited to a wedding, but can’t/don’t want to attend, do you have to send a gift? No. It’s polite, but no.
  33. A lady as a groom’s attendant? She should’t escort female guests to their seats, but can be part of all other activities.
  34. If a lady is a groom’s attendant, she can wear a dress that’s similar color to the men’s tuxes or bridesmaid’s dresses.
  35. Place an inner envelope into your outer envelope with the names on the inner facing the back of the outer.
  36. At cake cutting, the bride’s right hand goes on the knife & the groom’s hand atop hers (or reverse so u can see the ring!)
  37. Expect to need one usher for every 50 guests. Ushers do not have to be official groomsmen, but groomsmen can be ushers.
  38. Hiring reliable wedding professionals is essential in keeping calm & can make all the difference in how much you enjoy the day.
  39. Some coast states don’t have a gift table at their reception. In down-home states like SD, it is acceptable.
  40. Have a house-sitter while on your honeymoon. You have a house full of money, cards, gifts (and more arriving on your doorstep)
  41. Who should you invite to your rehearsal dinner? Family, wedding party, & out-of-towners.
  42. Try to send a bridal shower thank you note within 3 weeks and a wedding thank you within 3 months. (Not 1 year)
  43. Spell out everything in an address except Mr. & Mrs. Example: Street vs. St.; South Dakota vs. SD; Fifth vs. 5th
  44. Send your invitations out so they land in mailboxes 8 weeks before your big day. RSVP date: 3-4 weeks out.
  45. Give ushers a cheat sheet so they know where everyone is supposed to sit. Print out a list in case they forget!
  46. When preserving the top tier of your cake, use an air-tight container and wrap that in tinfoil. Put in freezer & enjoy in 1 yr!
  47. In a case where a couple’s names cannot fit on one line, place them on two lines with the second name indented
  48. If you have a receiving line, include these people in this order: MOB, FOB, MOG, FOG, bride, groom (MOH & BM optional)
  49. Destination Wedding Etiquette: For gifts, spread the word to “pack light!” & recommend no gifts at the wedding, but rather when you get home
  50. Only those invited to the wedding should be invited to bridal showers. Exceptions: work parties & some Midwest small towns
  51. The usher should offer the eldest lady in the arriving party his right arm. The remaining party follows behind.
  52. If your event won’t include a full meal, it’s courteous to say “join us for hors d’oeuvres” instead of “at the reception.”
  53. Wedding Invitation Etiquette Tip: If you don’t know a name, ask! Using the correct names will make people feel truly welcome and honored.
  54. Invitation Etiquette Tip: For divorced parents, put names on separate lines w/no “and” between. Mom always comes first. Use her married name
  55. Order as many wedding programs wedding as you did invitations (about 75% of your guest list). You can add a few more to be safe
  56. If the wedding ceremony & reception are in the same location, you can simply put “Reception to follow” on the invite.
  57. Wedding Invite Etiquette Tip: “And” in between two names implies that those people are married. Names of unmarried guests should be stacked.
  58. Women who are widowed should be addressed according to their late husband’s name, titled “Mrs.” (Mrs. George Brown).
  59. Include a pre-stamped postcard or pre-addressed envelope for your Reply card to increase response rate.
  60. When listing the ceremony time on your wedding invite, instead of “one-thirty, use “half past” or “half after two o’clock” all spelled out.
  61. No need to list the zip code of your reception location on your insert card. Venue and address is enough.
  62. Having a very formal wedding? You can address children under the age of 7 on your invitation as “Master Joel” or “Miss Anne”.
  63. If you want to mail your invitation for 1 stamp, make sure it weighs less than 1 ounce.(That’s about 3 pieces of card stock + envelope)
  64. If you’re marrying in a house of worship, use “the honor of your presence” on your invitation. If not, use “the pleasure of your company”.
  65. Etiquette: Send save-the-dates 6 months before your wedding date, send invitations 6-8 weeks early, & set RSVP response time to 3-4 weeks.
  66. If your divorced parents are both helping w/your wedding (whether remarried or not), list your mom first on the invite text.
  67. Wedding Envelope Address Etiquette: No punctuation, at least 10-point type, 1 space between city & state, 2 spaces between state & ZIP Code.
  68. Should you expect gifts when renewing your vows? Probably not. But having a wedding website where it’s listed is okay
  69. Gladiolus, rosemary, & pansies are flowers that signify remembrance in an arrangement at your wedding for loved ones who have passed.
  70. The proper place to list your return address is on the envelope’s back flap. Spell out all words here, too
  71. When listing the year, don’t include the word “and”. Example: “Two thousand thirteen” is the correct way.
  72. The groom uses the title “junior” if his father is listed as “senior”. Junior and senior should be listed lowercase.
  73. A priest should be addressed as “Reverend Father Robert Johnson“. A minister/pastor should be listed “Revered Kyle Harrison“
  74. Wedding colors have a 60-30-10 rule. 60% of your wedding should be 1 color, 30% another color, & 10% an accent color.
  75. Use the 2nd line of an invite/envelope to list children. Send a separate invitation to kids age 18+
  76. Wedding Invitation Etiquette: Stuff your envelopes with the insert cards in order of size, facing up, on top of your invitation.
  77. Invitation etiquette tip: Have a dark envelope color? Try a cute wrap-around sticker or metallic pen for addresses instead of printer labels

Any other questions? Hitch is happy to address them! Contact us here.

Leave a Comment